Manga and anime declared good study tools for kids

I think that teaching children how to read things (or understand things) that are interesting to them is very elegant. Seamless, you might say. Also: anime and manga plot lines can be VERY convoluted, and it must take some brainpower to make sense of them. That’s another plus…

Oh, and if you figured out a way to teach Japanese to them as they were interested in anime and manga well you are just helping them even more.

SoraNews24

kid_watching_tv01

Children’s books and television shows these days are nothing compared to the ones that many of us had growing up. At least that’s what we tell ourselves. I think back fondly on those days of watching Rugrats and Scooby Doo marathons and scoff at the thought of modern-age children rotting their brains with Spongebob and Annoying Orange. But the fact of the matter is that letting kids subject themselves to those books and animations is important to the development of reading comprehension and critical thinking skills, though the shows now seem like garbage to our fully-developed minds.

In Japan, the same sort of issue arises with kids becoming obsessed with manga and anime. Parents may try to insist that their children put away the comics and pick up a real book. Some may even go so far as to throw out their child’s comic magazines as they begin to…

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12 Status Symbols For 20-Somethings

Aiming for all these “elegant” additions to my lifestyle. 😀

Thought Catalog

In our 20s, most of us need to live very frugally. However, even those among us saddled with the most student loan debt in the most useless field has a day when they’re feeling rich. Here’s how we celebrate.

Going to the doctor

Every time you go to the doctor you can ride a chic-wave knowing that you’ve “made it.” Your illnesses can now be cured, moles checked and uncounted future diseases vaccinated. This is your moment to shine.

Household items

You remember the days of using ugly, inefficient cleaning items and dreaming of Swiffers and disposable dusters. Never in your life did you think you’d consider a vacuum cleaner a luxury item. And yet, here you are.

Pre-cut fruit

The mark-up on pre-cut fruit at the grocery store is insane. You can buy a whole package of fresh strawberries for $4 or you can buy the same size package…

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Aging Well

Aging well is definitely an elegant concept.

Live Life in Crescendo

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“Oh, I’m too old for that “.

Spoken by someone 80?

Spoken by a young man. He was too old to learn to snowboard.

So often aging fosters an ageism attitude against living life in crescendo.

It creates the perspective that there is a ‘proper’ age for pursuing a life pleasure.

Even a simple life pleasure.

Like pierced ears.

Unlike babies today who get theirs pierced at six months, I had gotten mine done at the age of twelve. As so often happens (apparently), the holes kept closing up, as I stopped wearing them while caring for my young sons. Glittering gold in a mother’s ears tempts babies to touch and to pull.

When I occasionally attempted to wear pierced earrings, each time I painfully re-pierced them. Finally, I gave up…

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How Fast is Exponential Growth? (Or, Yao Ming Confronts the Vastness of the Universe)

Being able to describe complex things in an understandable way is definitely an elegant thing to do… especially since it deals with math.

Math with Bad Drawings

On this humble brown planet, we’re used to things growing at a steady pace. Trees add a ring every year. Families expand by one child or marriage at a time. Even in their most extreme months of food-gobbling growth spurts, teenagers will sprout at most a few inches. All of these are examples of linear growth (or something close to it). It’s modest, approachable – something the human brain has no trouble grasping.

But not all growth is like this. Take the old story of the sultan and the beggar. The beggar comes before the sultan, pleading for some rice to eat. When the sultan asks how much he needs, the beggar cleverly points to a nearby chessboard. He asks the sultan to put 1 grain on the first square, 2 on the next, 4 on the next, 8 on the next, and so on, doubling the number of grains for…

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